Linter Settings

Each linter plugin is responsible for providing its own settings. In addition to the linter-provided settings, SublimeLinter adds the following settings to every linter:

@disable

This is actually a meta setting that is added to every linter’s settings. For a discussion of the @disable setting, see Meta Settings.

Rather than change this setting manually, you can use the user interface to disable or enable a linter.

args

This setting specifies extra arguments to pass to an external binary. This is useful when a linter binary supports an option that is not part of the linter’s settings.

The value may be a string or an array. If it is a string, it will be parsed as if it were passed on a command line. For example, these values are equivalent:

{
    "args": "--foo=bar --bar=7 --no-baz"
}

{
    "args": [
        "--foo=bar",
        "--bar=7",
        "--no-baz"
    ]
}

The default value is an empty array.

Note

If a linter runs python code directly, without calling an external binary, it is up to the linter to decide what to do with this setting.

excludes

This setting specifies a list of path patterns to exclude from linting. If there is only a single pattern, the value may be a string. Otherwise it must be an array of patterns.

Patterns are matched against a file’s absolute path with all symlinks/shortcuts resolved, using python’s fnmatch method. This means to match a filename, you must match everything in the path before the filename. For example, to exclude any python files whose name begins with “foo”, you would use this pattern:

{
    "excludes": "*/foo*.py"
}

The default value is an empty array.

ignore_match

This setting specifies a python regular expression that is matched against error messages reported by the linter. If the regular expression matches a message, the error is ignored.

The value of this setting may be:

  • A single regular expression pattern string.
  • An array of pattern strings.
  • A map, where the keys are lowercase filename extensions to match (with or without a leading dot), and the values are either single pattern strings or arrays of pattern strings.

Note

The pattern strings are regular JSON strings, not raw strings as you would usually use in python. If you need to escape regular expression pattern characters, be sure to use double backslashes (\\). For example, to match Undeclared (variable), you would have to use the string "Undeclared \\(variable\\)".

For example, the html-tidy linter complains if you are editing a portion of a page, as is often the case with php. The errors are:

missing <!DOCTYPE> declaration
inserting implicit <body>
inserting missing 'title' element

Obviously we don’t want to see those errors, because we know they don’t apply in this case. By using the ignore_match setting, we can ignore them like this:

{
    "ignore_match": [
        "missing <!DOCTYPE> declaration",
        "inserting implicit <body>",
        "inserting missing 'title' element"
    ]
}

Of course, since these are regular expressions, we could also do it like this:

{
    "ignore_match": [
        "missing <!DOCTYPE> declaration",
        "inserting (?:implicit <body>|missing 'title' element)"
    ]
}

Now let’s suppose you only want the ignore_match to apply to .inc files, which we use for partials. We can do that by using a map like this:

{
    "ignore_match": {
        "inc": [
            "missing <!DOCTYPE> declaration",
            "inserting (?:implicit <body>|missing 'title' element)"
        ]
}

In debug mode, SublimeLinter logs each occurrence of an ignore match.

Note

If you need help constructing a regular expression, the re-try site provides an easy way to test out your regular expressions. Be sure to uncheck the “options” checkboxes.